Catherine West MP

Labour MP for Hornsey & Wood Green

Articles

As Vice-Chair of the APPG for Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases, I wrote this article for The House magazine, published on Politics Home.

"Earlier this month, 53 Commonwealth Heads of Government convened in the UK to reaffirm common values, address shared global challenges and agree on how to work to create a better future for all Commonwealth citizens. One theme that inspired conversations was ‘Vision for the Commonwealth’ and the elimination of trachoma, one of 20 neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO).

Motivated by the devastation NTDs cause in the developing world, the UK has a long history of cross-parliamentary support led by the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Malaria & Neglected Tropical Diseases, of which I am a Vice-Chair. NTD investments are widely recognised for their value for money, and successive governments have used funding and influence to help catalyse the academic, public and private sector to take action. This global leadership was reiterated at CHOGM when the International Development Secretary, announced a £20m fund to support trachoma elimination efforts in ten Commonwealth countries.

In light of the significant social and economic consequences trachoma has on communities, including disability, stigma and exclusion, the fund will address a range of global priorities set in the Sustainable Development Goals, including poverty reduction, good health and well-being, quality education and clean water and sanitation. Trachoma is responsible for up to US$8bn in lost productivity every year and exacerbates poverty of the communities it affects by preventing them from working. However, thanks to UK aid and other donors, the WHO-endorsed SAFE Strategy to eliminate trachoma has been scaled up, helping to reduce the number of people living in endemic regions from 325 million in 2011 to 182 million in 2016. 

The two-year fund will significantly boost elimination efforts in Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania, Pakistan, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Tonga, Kiribati, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. With 52 million people across 21 countries at risk, this funding will be key to developing a more sustainable and prosperous future for all citizens.  

UK aid has long supported work to eliminate trachoma. The DfID-funded SAFE Program has to date managed over 100,000 trichiasis surgeries and distributed over 40 million antibiotic treatments to almost 18 million people in Chad, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Tanzania and Zambia. It has also supported important water, hygiene and sanitation (WASH) work that educates communities about trachoma prevention and empowers them to improve their own health.

In partnership with the US Agency for International Development, UK aid funded the world’s largest ever-infectious disease survey, the Global Trachoma Mapping Project (GTMP) between 2012 and 2016. Using smart phone technology GTMP collected data from 2.6 million people in 29 countries, accurately identifying where trachoma interventions needed to be implemented. The methodology behind GTMP is now being continued by a service called Tropical Data, to provide real time data to ministries of health, ensuring they have the information needed for effective planning. Tropical Data is also being asked to support baseline mapping of other NTDs in the 2012 London Declaration on Neglected Tropical Diseases, including schistosomiasis and lymphatic filariasis.

The UK’s commitment has been supported by additional donors including The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust’s Trachoma Initiative, which is working towards the elimination of trachoma in 12 Commonwealth countries, to leave a lasting legacy in honour of Her Majesty The Queen. Moreover, partnerships with the private sector have resulted in over 700 million drugs being donated since 1999.

As the UK expands its support for people with disabilities at the first Global Disability Summit, to be held in London in July, lessons from UK funded trachoma programmes should be shared so that all people with disabilities are empowered and no one is left behind.

The public can be proud of its contribution to trachoma elimination efforts. With new and continued donor partnerships, endemic country government leadership, opportunities to promote cross-parliamentary learnings to champion and address global health challenges, the global elimination of trachoma is achievable. We have the strategy to eliminate trachoma and the time to do it is now." 

The UK is leading global efforts to eliminate tropical diseases

As Vice-Chair of the APPG for Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases, I wrote this article for The House magazine, published on Politics Home. "Earlier this month, 53 Commonwealth Heads of...

My article for the Times Red Box on the shameful treatment of the Windrush Generation by Theresa May and her Conservative Government.  Published 17 April 2018.  

May turned her back on Europe, now she is turning her back on the Windrush Generation

My article for the Times Red Box on the shameful treatment of the Windrush Generation by Theresa May and her Conservative Government.  Published 17 April 2018.   Read more

My article for the Ham&High

Suffragettes 100: Celebrate progress but push for change

My article for the Ham&High Read more

My letter to the Guardian:

The global elite gathered once again last week to discuss the world’s economic outlook. Many are getting away with tax avoidance on an industrial scale.

As questions linger over how much tax companies are paying, what is equitable and global harmonisation, so do those over tax transparency. Progress on tax avoidance has been slow, with Theresa May only appointing John Penrose as anti-corruption champion in December. The strategy is far from concrete.

The promised register of the true owners of overseas companies that own UK property has been pushed back to summer 2019. We know that the UK’s tax havens are providing luxury vehicles to the corrupt to launder and spend their money. If Penrose wants to make a difference, he must add a renewed focus and pressure the government to reform the financial services industries in these crown dependencies and overseas territories, which must have public registers of beneficial ownership.

And anti-corruption provisions should be made in all trade agreements. The upcoming commonwealth heads of government meeting is a huge opportunity to push for this. Movement has simply been too slow.

If we are to truly lead the world in tackling corruption, we can start in our own backyard.

Theresa May still too slow on tax avoidance

My letter to the Guardian: The global elite gathered once again last week to discuss the world’s economic outlook. Many are getting away with tax avoidance on an industrial scale....

My article for the Huffington Post.

In Turkey, Human Rights Are As Inalienable As They Were 70 Years Ago

My article for the Huffington Post. Read more

My article for the Independent.

 

If Penny Mordaunt really believes in aid, she should put funding back into HIV and Aids prevention

My article for the Independent.   Read more

My article for the Ham&High.

The UK should open its doors to international students

My article for the Ham&High. Read more

My article for the New Statesman.

With two sentences, Boris Johnson has undone months of hard work

My article for the New Statesman. Read more

My article for Chartist.

Brexit: How Labour can respond

My article for Chartist. Read more

My latest article for Progress.

 

No more policing on the cheap

My latest article for Progress.   Read more

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